Workplace bullying, socially aversive attitudes, reduced work group effectiveness, and organizational frustration

Sean R. Valentine, Robert A. Giacalone, Gary Fleischman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Given that workplace bullying can harm employees' thoughts, perceptions, and experiences, this study explored how bullying triggers socially aversive attitudes in victims, as well as diminished work group effectiveness and increased organizational frustration. Using time-lagged data collected from research panelists, the hierarchical regression results indicated that workplace bullying can lead to distrust of others, a self-focused strategy based on the belief that workplace advancement is political, and reduced work group cohesion and communication, ultimately resulting in organizational frustration. The managerial/practical and research implications of these findings and the connections to human resource development (HRD) are highlighted, including the need for managers and professionals involved in HRD to prevent and arrest workplace bullying. The research limitations and suggestions for future work are also presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-153
Number of pages23
JournalHuman Resource Development Quarterly
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2021

Keywords

  • frustration
  • social aversion
  • work group effectiveness
  • workplace bullying

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