Wind turbines research at Los Alamos National Laboratory - Integrating experimental aerodynamics, sensing, structural mechanics and numerical simulations

B. J. Balakumar, C. Ammerman, S. Pol, R. Linn, E. Koo, G. Ellis, G. Park, K. Farinholt, R. C. Alarcon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

In support of the Department of Energy's goal of achieving 20% wind energy by 2030, Los Alamos National Laboratory's Intelligent Wind Turbine (IWT) project has developed and applied novel diagnostics, supercomputing simulation tools, custom-built sensing platforms and detailed structural models to study wind turbine reliability. These leaps in the current state-of-the-art include (a) Large Field of View and Rotating Particle Image Velocimetry diagnostics to resolve flow fields around wind turbines, (b) supercomputing simulations that incorporate complex terrains and resolve scales ranging from 2m to several Kms, (c) detailed blade models for aero-elastic simulations, and (d) structural health monitoring hardware and algorithms. Fusing information from different, independent techniques, the IWT project aims to develop an integrated framework for investigating turbine-turbine interactions and turbine reliability. Here, we report our recent progress in these areas, and discuss how these tools will be utilized effectively to understand aero-structural dynamics at LANL's Wind Turbine Field Station.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication6th AIAA Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Conference
StatePublished - 2011
Event6th AIAA Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Conference - Honolulu, HI, United States
Duration: Jun 27 2011Jun 30 2011

Publication series

Name6th AIAA Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Conference

Conference

Conference6th AIAA Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Conference
CountryUnited States
CityHonolulu, HI
Period06/27/1106/30/11

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