“Why not?”: How STEM identity development promotes Black transfer and transition.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Policy makers have argued that increasing the number of highly skilled STEM professionals is critical to the economic stability and growth of the US. In addition, a desire to resolve the historically low representation of racial/ethnic-minority students in STEM has been a critical aspect of the discussion. Using science identity theory (Carlone & Johnson, 2007), this study explores how the tenets of science identity help Black students develop a science identity and transition from the community college to a four-year institution. Based in the results of this qualitative study, the development of science identity promoted the desire to major in a STEM degree and facilitated the transfer and transition to the university for Black students.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343- 357
JournalJournal of Negro Education
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 20 2019

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