Where You Lead, I Will Follow: Exploring Sibling Similarity in Brain and Behavior During Risky Decision Making

Christy R. Rogers, Tae Ho Lee, Cassidy M. Fry, Eva H. Telzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This exploratory study examined whether social learning increases similarity in adolescent siblings’ behavior and neural patterns during risky decision making. Participants included 86 adolescents (43 sibling dyads; younger siblings: Mage = 12.2 years; 22 females; older siblings: Mage = 14.6 years; 20 females) who completed questionnaires, and a decision-making task during an fMRI scan. Younger siblings became more similar to their older siblings’ risky decision making after observing their older sibling take risks). Younger siblings who reported greater modeling of their older sibling, and less differentiation from them, showed increased neural similarity to their older siblings in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and the right anterior insula and ventral striatum, respectively. These findings highlight siblings as salient social agents in how adolescents process risky decision making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-51
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

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