Weathering the cold: Modifying Membrane and Storage Fatty Acid Composition of Seeds to Improve Cold Germination Ability in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

Jacobo Sanchez, Puneet Kaur Mangat, Rosalyn B. Angeles-Shim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Cotton is widely cultivated in temperate regions across the world and is often constrained by a short planting window that is bookended by low, suboptimal temperatures. With the growing interest in early season planting, improvements in the cold germination ability of cotton will be necessary to ensure the production stability of early planted crops. The importance of saturation levels of membrane and storage lipids in enhancing cold tolerance in plants, as well as improving cold germination ability in seeds have been widely researched in a range of plant species. While studies have shown that higher levels of unsaturated lipids can enhance cold germination ability and reduce seedling injury in other crops, similar efforts have been fairly limited in cotton. This review looks at the functional properties of membrane and storage lipids, and their role in membrane stability and reorganization during the early stages of germination. Additionally, the importance of storage lipid composition as an energy source to the growing embryo is described in the context of cellular energetics (i.e., fatty acid catabolism). Finally, perspectives in improving the cold germination of upland cotton by manipulating the fatty acid composition of both membrane and storage lipid content of seeds are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Article number684
JournalAgronomy
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 26 2019

Keywords

  • Cold tolerance
  • Fatty acids
  • Gossypium hirsutum L
  • Lipid unsaturation
  • Seed germination
  • Upland cotton

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