Visual Intertextuality Chapter: Exploring Political Communication and Visual Intertextuality through Meme Wars

Sherice Gearhart, Bingbing Zhang, David Perlmutter, Gordana Lazic

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Drawing from the literary/semiotic tradition, studies of editing and mise-en-scène, and the analyses of commercial and political advertising as the foundation, this chapter defines “visual intertextuality” as a practice of producing and/or assigning meaning to texts formed out of symbioses of images and words that reference other texts or parts of other texts. This chapter maintains that political memes are digital, creative, often humorous, and fleeting cultural units that have the potential to function differently in democratic and non-democratic societies. To illustrate how modern visual intertextuality shapes political discourses, this chapter examines political memes as rhetorical artifacts and examples of contemporary visual intertextuality. Political memes demonstrate visual intertextuality by depicting, referencing, and/or alluding to political subjects “and” creating a synergy between visual and lexical forms of expression. Further, political memes enable audiences to partici
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVisual Intertextuality Chapter: Exploring Political Communication and Visual Intertextuality through Meme Wars
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Pages367-394
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

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