Using self-regulation theory to inform technology-based behavior change interventions

Amr Soror, Fred Davis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research geared toward technology use to promote health-related behaviors has been rapidly expanding, yet evidence regarding the effectiveness of the proposed interventions is inconclusive. The proposed study builds on self-regulation theory, persuasive system design model, and task-technology fit model to propose design guidelines essential for translating intentions to engage in a desired health-related behavior into actual behavior. The current study proposes that mobile applications will have stronger potential to support their users in executing users' intended health-related behaviors if the applications are designed to (i) monitor and provide feedback to users about the discrepancy between their current and desired levels of behavior, (ii) encourage users to change their behavior, and facilitate the selection of strategies needed to execute the targeted changes, and (iii) ease the execution of selected strategies. The potential implications of the proposed guidelines for practice and research will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 47th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages3004-3012
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9781479925049
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014 - Waikoloa, HI, United States
Duration: Jan 6 2014Jan 9 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
ISSN (Print)1530-1605

Conference

Conference47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014
CountryUnited States
CityWaikoloa, HI
Period01/6/1401/9/14

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    Soror, A., & Davis, F. (2014). Using self-regulation theory to inform technology-based behavior change interventions. In Proceedings of the 47th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014 (pp. 3004-3012). [6758974] (Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences). IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2014.373