Using implanted passive integrated transponders to monitor long-term burrow fidelity in a theraphosid spider, Aphonopelma hollyi

Donna E. Hamilton, Nancy E. McIntyre, Densmore Lewellyn D

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

For 14 months, we monitored burrow fidelity of 16 PIT-tagged female tarantulas (Aphonopelma hollyi). During this time, all of them abandoned their burrows. Using multiple-regression analyses, we determined that the model including maximum air temperature, cumulative monthly precipitation, and days of precipitation per month accounted for 48.82 of the variation explaining the percentage of females remaining in their burrow at each monthly interval. After controlling for seasonal effects of photoperiod or solar radiation, days of measurable precipitation was the only variable that made a significant contribution to the model. Tarantulas may respond to instability in the soil caused by intermittent heavy rainfall by abandoning their burrows.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-147
Number of pages4
JournalSouthwestern Naturalist
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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