Use of self-perspectives and their sources to predict the mathematics enrollment intentions of girls and boys

Tara Stevens, Kun Wang, Arturo Olivárez, Doug Hamman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

An understanding of the differences in the ways in which self-efficacy and interest influence boys' and girls' intentions to continue enrollment in mathematics courses may provide insight into how to encourage continued mathematics enrollment for all students. Two competing theoretical models of mathematics self-efficacy and interest in predicting students' enrollment intentions and achievement were evaluated separately across samples of middle level boys and girls. One model was empirically supported for both groups and indicated the independent influence of self-efficacy and interest in predicting enrollment intentions. Multi-group analyses revealed that self-efficacy's influence in enrollment intentions and achievement was significantly stronger for boys than for girls, and interest was significantly more important in the prediction of enrollment intentions for girls than for boys.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-363
Number of pages13
JournalSex Roles
Volume56
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Keywords

  • Ability
  • Achievement
  • Gender
  • Mathematics interest
  • Mathematics self-efficacy
  • Self-perspectives

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