Urban and rural attitudes toward municipal water controls: A study of a semi-arid region with limited water supplies

R. Gary Pumphrey, Jeffrey A. Edwards, Klaus G. Becker

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveypeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study addresses the effectiveness of using pricing mechanisms, government-imposed constraints, or a hybrid, as a means of rationing municipal water. We try to test which policies would be most accepted among rural and urban communities in a semi-arid region of Texas that depend on both surface and groundwater sources for their municipal supplies. This study reveals that a hybrid conservation policy that includes mandatory restrictions, fines for overuse, and pricing increases could be more acceptable, and hence more efficient, than a policy that only consists of regulation. Moreover, there is not a significant dichotomy in policy preferences between rural and urban constituents; although those in rural communities would seem to appreciate far less regulatory policy than would urbanites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalEcological Economics
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2008

Keywords

  • Conservation
  • Policy
  • Rural
  • Urban
  • Water

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