Understanding the Nature of Science Moderates the Effect of Identity Factors on Public Acceptance of Science

Deena Weisberg, Asheley Landrum, Jesse Hamilton, Michael Weisberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While people’s views about science are related to identity factors (e.g. political orientation) and to knowledge of scientific theories, knowledge about how science works in general also plays an important role. To test this claim, we administered two detailed assessments about the practices of science to a demographically representative sample of the US public (N = 1500), along with questions about the acceptance of evolution, climate change, and vaccines. Participants’ political and religious views predicted their acceptance of scientific claims, as in prior work. But a greater knowledge of the nature of science and a more mature view of how to mitigate scientific disagreements each related positively to acceptance. Importantly, the positive effect of scientific thinking on acceptance held regardless of participants’ political ideology or religiosity. Increased attention to developing people’s knowledge of how science works could thus help to combat resistance to scientific c
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-138
JournalPublic Understanding of Science
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2021

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