Understanding student and faculty attitudes with respect to service learning: Lessons from the Humanitarian Engineering Program

E. Heidi Bauer, Barbara Moskal, Joan Gosink, Juan Lucena, David Muñoz

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Now entering its second year, the Humanitarian Engineering Program, which is sponsored by the Hewlett Foundation, at the Colorado School of Mines is creating curriculum that will support engineering students in developing an understanding of their responsibility for solving humanitarian problems that exist throughout the world. As part of this effort, baseline data has been collected on both the faculty and student attitudes towards service activities using the "Community Service Attitudes Scale" which was developed and validated by Shiarella, McCarthy, and Tucker1. During the fall of 2004, 78 students and 34 faculty responded to this assessment instrument. Student data were collected in the first semester of the Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratory course sequence, a required course taken at the start of students' sophomore year before they have the opportunity to participate in the newly revised service learning courses. Faculty completed the attitudes survey during the first faculty meeting of the academic year. This paper describes and compares student and faculty attitudes with respect to service activities prior to the proposed intervention. Attention is given to attitudinal differences between male and female students and among students in different age groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14725-14734
Number of pages10
JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - 2005
Event2005 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: The Changing Landscape of Engineering and Technology Education in a Global World - Portland, OR, United States
Duration: Jun 12 2005Jun 15 2005

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