Underreporting of Crime-Related Content and the Prediction of Criminal Recidivism Among Violent Offenders

Daryl G. Kroner, Jeremy F. Mills, Robert D. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was threefold: (1) to examine offenders' underreporting of crime-related content, (2) examine explanations for underreporting, and (3) investigate if accounting for underreporting increases predictability of recidivism over a standardized risk assessment instrument. Participants consisted of 89 adult male offenders incarcerated for violent offenses. Analysis revealed that when relying on offenders' self-report of crime-related content, only 10% of information is lost because of underreporting. Correlation analyses indicated that underreporting was not explained by impression management, arrogant/deceitful interpersonal style, or number of past convictions. Finally, logistic and Poisson regression analyses indicated that accounting for underreporting in the prediction of recidivism did not increase predictive validity over a standardized risk assessment instrument. Implication of these results for offender assessment and criminal risk assessment are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-95
Number of pages11
JournalPsychological services
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Keywords

  • criminal prediction
  • self-report
  • underreporting
  • violent offenders

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