Uncertainty and Roll-Call Voting in Lame-duck Sessions of the House of Representatives, 1969-2010

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lame-duck sessions of Congress have become increasingly common of late.  Such sessions are marked by higher levels of ideological and participatory shirking among departing members, creating a more uncertain legislative environment.  I investigate the consequences of such shirking on coalition formation and roll-call behavior.  I analyze House roll-call votes held in the 12 congresses that convened lame-duck sessions from 1969 to 2010 (91st to 111th Congresses) to assess how roll-call behavior changes across sessions.  I find statistically significant, but subtle changes across sessions consistent with claims regarding greater uncertainty in roll-call voting in lame-duck sessions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-592
JournalLegislative Studies Quarterly/Wiley
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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