Transitioning out of peer victimization in school children: Gender and behavioral characteristics

Jared P. Dempsey, Gary D. Fireman, Eugene Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study investigated the characteristics of children who remain consistently peer victimized in comparison to those who transition out of victimization status. The relationships between victimization and the victim's level of overt aggression, relational aggression, impulsivity, and prosocial behaviors were examined from one year to the next. At Time 1, 1589 3rd, 4th, and 5th-grade children were administered a peer nomination instrument assessing victimization and standard sociometric variables. At Time 2 (1 year later), 1619 3rd, 4th, and 5th-grade children were administered the same measure. A mixed-design repeated measures MANOVA was conducted for boys and girls separately. Results indicated that in comparison to victims transitioning out of victimization status, consistently victimized boys were lower in prosocial behavior, and consistently victimized girls were higher in impulsivity. Results for girls also indicated that a reduction in victim's own level of relational aggression was associated with cessation of victimization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-282
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Bullying
  • Overt victimization
  • Peer nomination
  • Relational victimization

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