Toxicant and dietary exposures as unique environmental factors that affect the genetic regulation of activity

Emily E. Schmitt, Heather L. Vellers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses two unique environmental influencers of the genetic regulation of activity and potential mechanisms through which each are hypothesized to regulate activity. Prior to genetics being considered a regulator of physical activity, work from the early 1920s and 1930s suggested that daily activity was controlled through biological mechanisms. Wang, Richter, and colleagues investigated the relationship between the female reproductive cycle and wheel-running behavior in rodents. The harmful consequences of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on human health have been widely studied over the past few decades and growing evidence has supported that man-made chemicals contribute to adverse health effects on humans and wildlife. In short, EDCs are ubiquitous in environment with exposure ranging from personal care products to food packaging and processing. Disruption in hormone levels from EDC exposure can cause a variety of physiological problems that vary in severity and differ by sex, few studies have examined the direct relationship between EDC exposure and physical activity.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRoutledge Handbook of Sport and Exercise Systems Genetics
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages117-132
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781351380164
ISBN (Print)9781138504851
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Schmitt, E. E., & Vellers, H. L. (2019). Toxicant and dietary exposures as unique environmental factors that affect the genetic regulation of activity. In Routledge Handbook of Sport and Exercise Systems Genetics (pp. 117-132). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315146287-10