Through the Looking Glass: The impact of Google Glass on perceptions of face-to-face interaction

Nicholas David Bowman, Jaime Banks, David K. Westerman

Research output: Other contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Advancements in wearable technology have allowed for extradyadic social cues to be inserted directly (albeit conspicuously) into face-to-face interactions. The current study simulated a fictitious “Looking Glass” program that (a) autodetects (via facial recognition) one’s partner and (b) displays that person’s last 12 social media posts on a pair of Google Glass. In a randomized case/control experiment, nonwearers were more likely to perceive Glass wearers as physically attractive and socioemotionally close, while feeling lower self-esteem and having higher mental and physical demand with the conversation. Open-ended data suggested Glass wearers to be less attentive to the conversation, and Glass-present conversations were less on topic. These data, while preliminary and based on a small sample of users, hold implications for future application and research on cyborgic face-to-face interactions.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherCommunication Research Reports
Volume33
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 14 2016

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