Theorizing the Value of English Proficiency in Cross-Cultural Rhetorics of Health and Medicine: A Qualitative Study

Amy Koerber, Hilary Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study reports the results of 12 recent interviews with nonnative-English-speaking (NNES) authors who have conducted research and written articles on health and medical subjects. Analyzing the interview transcripts through the theoretical lens of Pierre Bourdieu’s forms of capital, this study expands on previous research by offering a more precise and theoretically grounded understanding of how NNES authors perceive the value of English proficiency in relation to their success as scientific researchers. This theorization of the varying ways in which authors perceive the value of English proficiency affords new perspectives on the inequities that NNES authors encounter in the global publishing economy and their rhetorical strategies for overcoming these inequities. The study concludes by reflecting on theoretical and practical implications for researchers, teachers, and other stakeholders in the global publishing industry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-93
Number of pages31
JournalJournal of Business and Technical Communication
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Bourdieu
  • global publishing
  • intercultural communication
  • qualitative research
  • scientific and medical communication

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