Theories of social competence from the top-down to the bottom-up: A case for considering foundational human needs

Kathryn N. Stump, Jacklyn M. Ratliff, Yelena P. Wu, Patricia H. Hawley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social competence is an oft-studied, little understood construct that nonetheless remains a hallmark of positive, healthy functioning across the life span. Social competence itself, however, remains a nebulous concept in the developmental literature, particularly in the peer relations field. Dodge (1985) pointed out that there are nearly as many definitions of social competence as there are researchers in the field. Likewise, Ladd (2005) outlined the century-long academic history of research on social competence and also noted its numerous conceptualizations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial Behavior and Skills in Children
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages23-37
Number of pages15
ISBN (Print)9781441902337
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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