The utility of infrared spectroscopy as a probe of intact tissue: Determination of carbon monoxide and hemeproteins in blood and heart muscle

John C. Maxwell, Clyde H. Barlow, Julian E. Spallholz, Winslow S. Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Infrared methods permit detection of CO within tissue under nearly physiological conditions. The CO stretch bands exhibit frequencies, band widths and intensities characteristic of the particular binding site with areas related to concentrations. For small volumes (< 1 ml) of whole blood the % HbCO as well as certain abnormal Hbs are rapidly determined. In heart muscle, CO bound to cytochrome oxidase, hemoglobin and myoglobin is observed at 1963, 1951 and 1944 cm-1 respectively, frequencies characteristic of the isolated proteins. Infrared methods discriminate among possible CO binding sites (hemeprotein or other) within any intact tissue. Many other infrared active molecules or groups could also be studied in tissue by infrared spectroscopy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)230-236
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 6 1974

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The utility of infrared spectroscopy as a probe of intact tissue: Determination of carbon monoxide and hemeproteins in blood and heart muscle'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this