The Use of Video Annotation Tools and Informal Online Discussions to Explore Preservice Teachers’ Self- and Peer-Evaluation of Academic Feedback

Amani Zaier, Ismahan Arslan-Ari, Faith Maina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study explored the quality of preservice teachers’ self- and peer-academic feedback using video annotation tools to capture their teaching practices. They were also provided with an informal online discussion board as part of the peer support system. Twenty-five preservice teachers at a large university in the Southwestern United States volunteered to participate in this study. Data revealed a striking difference between self-evaluation and peer-evaluation. Preservice teachers rated themselves considerably higher compared with their peer-evaluation. The quality of the academic feedback and evaluation remained at the surface level with a mismatch between areas of refinement and areas of reinforcement. Evidence-based feedback and constructive criticism for areas of refinement were openly given during the informal discussion forums. Despite the inconsistency, preservice teachers perceived online communication through discussion posts as a valuable source of building relationships and providing support system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-27
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Education
Volume201
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • academic feedback
  • instructional videos
  • online discussions
  • peer-evaluation
  • preservice teachers
  • self-evaluation

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