The time course of passive stiffness responses following an acute bout of static stretching in healthy, elderly men

Ty B. Palmer, Ahalee C. Farrow, Chinonye C. Agu-Udemba, Ethan A. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The time course of passive stiffness responses following an acute bout of static stretching has received little research attention, particularly in older adults. Objective: To determine the time course of the acute effects of static stretching on passive stiffness of the hamstrings in healthy, elderly men. Methods: Fifteen elderly men (age = 70 ± 7 years) underwent two randomized conditions that included a control treatment and an experimental treatment of four, 15-s straight-leg raise static stretches. Passive stiffness was calculated as the slopes of the initial and final phases of the angle-torque curve at pre-treatment (Pre) and post-treatment time points of zero (Post0), five (Post5), and ten (Post10) minutes. Results: Passive stiffness collapsed across phase was lower at Post0 (P= .029, d= 0.64) and Post5 (P= .042, d= 0.54) but not Post10 (P> .999, d= 0.15) compared to Pre for the stretching treatment. There were no significant differences in passive stiffness (collapsed across phase) between any of the time points (P> .999, d≤ 0.14) for the control. Conclusions: An acute bout of static stretching produced significant decreases in the passive stiffness characteristics of elderly men; however, these decreases returned to baseline values within 5 to 10 minutes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPhysiotherapy Theory and Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Aging
  • hamstrings
  • range of motion
  • straight-leg raise

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