The Strange Bedfellows of Northern Belize: British Colonialists, Confederate Dreamers, Creole Loggers, and the Caste War Maya of the Late Nineteenth Century

Eleanor Harrison-Buck, Brett A. Houk, Adam R. Kaeding, Brooke Bonorden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Following the U.S. Civil War, groups of ex-Confederates arrived in Belize as clashes with Caste War Maya reached their peak, resulting in more frequent Maya raiding of British and Creole logging camps. Cross-examining ethnohistoric and archaeological data from Maya, ex-Confederate, Creole, and British sites in northern Belize, we aim to better understand the distinct identities and myriad relationships of these odd bedfellows. The colonizers (British and ex-Confederates) had divergent agendas, but each used limited supplies of Euro-American imports, namely guns and tobacco products, in the remote colonial frontier to form powerful economic dependencies with Maya and Creole groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-203
Number of pages32
JournalInternational Journal of Historical Archaeology
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2019

Keywords

  • Caste war Maya
  • Colonialism
  • Creole
  • Ex-Confederates
  • Formal/informal economies
  • Nineteenth-century British Honduras

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