The role of social class, ethnocultural adaptation, and masculinity ideology on Mexican American college men’s well-bein

Brandy Watson, Brandy Watson, Gererdo Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Limited research has taken an intersectional approach in which masculinity, ethnicity, and social class are collectively considered in understanding Latino men’s well-being. This study aims to address this gap by examining the role of perceived social class, familismo, acculturation, enculturation, Mexican American attitudinal marginalization, and masculinity ideology on well-being for 134 Mexican American college men. Hierarchical multiple regression results indicated that men felt more satisfied with their lives when they perceived themselves to be of higher social class, adhered to familismo and to Mexican culture, expressed lower levels of marginalized attitudes toward Mexican American cultural norms, and had less traditional male role attitudes. Implications for counseling and future research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-379
JournalPsychology of Men & Masculinity
StatePublished - 2016

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