The role of social class, ethnocultural adaptation, and masculinity ideology on Mexican American college men's well-being

Lizette Ojeda, Brandy Piña-Watson, Gerardo Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Limited research has taken an intersectional approach in which masculinity, ethnicity, and social class arecollectively considered in understanding Latino men's well-being. This study aims to address this gap byexamining the role of perceived social class, familismo, acculturation, enculturation, Mexican American attitudinal marginalization, and masculinity ideology on well-being for 134 Mexican American college men ranging in age from 17 to 42 years (M = 20.64, SD = 3.92). Hierarchical multiple regression resultsindicated that men felt more satisfied with their lives when they perceived themselves to be of highersocial class, adhered to familismo and to Mexican culture, expressed lower levels of marginalizedattitudes toward Mexican American cultural norms, and had less traditional male role attitudes. Themodel collectively accounted for 26% of the variance in well-being, with perceived social class being thestrongest predictor. The implications for practice and research are discussed in relation to understandingLatino men's well-being within the context of intersectionality and masculinity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-379
Number of pages7
JournalPsychology of Men and Masculinity
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Familismo
  • Life satisfaction
  • Male roles
  • Socioeconomic status

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