The role of network support and interference in women's perception of romantic, friend, and parental relationships

Laura Bryan, Jacki Fitzpatrick, Duane Crawford, Judith Fischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the association between support/interference from the best friend and closest parent to women's (a) satisfaction with the parent-daughter relationship, (b) satisfaction with the friendship, and (c) love for the romantic partner. The respondents (n = 162 females; 84% Caucasian, 1% Asian American, 10% Hispanic, 4% African American, and 1% Multiracial) completed a questionnaire packet to assess each of the factors. Results revealed that romantic love was unrelated to friend support, friend interference, or parental interference, but positively related to parental support. Parent support was a significant correlate of parent satisfaction, and a similar pattern emerged between friend support/friendship satisfaction. Further, best friend support moderated the relationship between friend interference and friendship satisfaction, such that interference was negatively related to satisfaction in low support conditions. Overall, the results suggested that network reactions to romance played a limited role in romantic affection, but were more strongly associated with network satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)481-499
Number of pages19
JournalSex Roles
Volume45
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2001

Keywords

  • Love
  • Romantic
  • Social networks
  • Support/interference

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The role of network support and interference in women's perception of romantic, friend, and parental relationships'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this