The Relationship between Video Game Play and the Acquired Capability for Suicide: An Examination of Differences by Category of Video Game and Gender

Sean M. Mitchell, Danielle R. Jahn, Evan T. Guidry, Kelly C. Cukrowicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between video game (VG) play and the acquired capability for suicide (ACS), as well as the moderating effects of VG category and gender on this relationship. Participants were 228 college students who played VGs on a weekly basis and who completed self-report assessments of VG play, painful and provocative events, and the ACS. Results indicated that there was a significant positive association between hours of VG play and the ACS. The action category of VGs was a significant moderator of the relationship between hours of VG play and the ACS after adjusting for previous painful and provocative events. Gender did not significantly moderate the relationship between hours of VG play and the ACS, and there was no significant three-way interaction between hours of VG play, playing action category VGs, and gender. This suggests that individuals who play many hours of action VGs may be more capable of lethal self-harm if they experience suicide ideation, although this association does not exist for individuals who play other categories of VGs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-762
Number of pages6
JournalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume18
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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