The relation of student behavior, peer status, race, and gender to decisions about school discipline using CHAID decision trees and regression modeling.

Stacy Horner, Gary D. Fireman, Eugene Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A diverse sample of 1493 participants in elementary school were administered a standard peer nomination measure (Crick & Grotpeter, 1995) to examine which nominated behaviors (overt and relational aggression, impulsivity, prosocial behavior), and classroom contextual factors (nominated peer status and the demographics of race and gender) best predict teacher decisions about disciplinary actions. Exploratory results indicated that those children who were judged by their peers to be average or highly overtly aggressive were more likely to be disciplined than low overt aggression students. Amongst the average and high overt aggression students, race was the most significant predictor, with African American students more likely to be disciplined than any other race. Amongst the low overt aggression students, a lack of prosocial behavior was the most significant predictor. Confirmatory analysis supported the exploratory results; specifically being either African American or overtly aggres
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of School Psychology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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