The intersection of fatalismo and pessimism on depressive symptoms and suicidality of Mexican American adolescents: An attribution perspective

Brandy Watson, Ana Abraído-Lanza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to advance the field’s understanding of the role fatalismo plays on the mental health of Mexican American adolescents. The major premise of this study is that it is the level of negative attribution that explains the negative relationship between fatalismo values and mental health outcomes, not the fatalistic belief itself. Methods: A sample of 524 Mexican American adolescents from a mid-sized city in south Texas were surveyed (age range 14-20; M = 16.23 years; SD = 1.10 years). Results: Linear and multiple regression analyses demonstrate that pessimism independently and positively predicts depression, hopelessness, suicidal ideation, plans and attempts. Predetermination and luck beliefs were not found to independently predict any outcomes; however, pessimism moderated the relationship between predetermination beliefs and suicidal ideation, plans and attempts. Conclusions: In this study higher levels of negative attributions place an ind
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-101
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
StatePublished - Jan 2017

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