The Intersection of Citizenship Status, STEM Education, and Expected Labor Market Participation in Gulf Cooperation Council Countries

Alexander W. Wiseman, Faisal A. Abdelfattah, Ahmad Almassaad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Citizenship status influences the impact of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education on the youth labor market participation in the Arabian Gulf. This research examines the relationship between citizenship status, STEM education, and expected labor market participation in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, and examines the intervening effects of information and communication technology (ICT) based instruction, specifically. The 2011 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) provides both labor market expectations and STEM education data from all participating GCC countries, including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Results suggest that ICT-enhanced STEM education differently influences the human capital development of Gulf national and expatriate youth. For example, GCC nationals do not emphasize STEM education as an avenue for employment, while expatriate youth do. In particular, as Gulf national youths' parents' education level increases, students are less likely to think they need to do well in science to get the job they want. This is indicative of a broader trend in the Gulf nations to rely more on non-education-related factors such as family influence or connections for social, economic, and political mobility. In contrast, results also suggest that while STEM education contributes to potential private sector labor market participation among Gulf national youth, expatriate youth are more likely to expect to need or use STEM in the labor market.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)362-392
Number of pages31
JournalDigest of Middle East Studies
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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