The Impact of Visualizing Use versus Acquisition of a Product on the Appeal of its Complement

Yael Zemack-Rugar, Rebecca Rabino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prior work on consumer visualization has focused on how visualization increases the appeal of the imagined product itself. Instead, the present work examines the effects of visualization on the appeal of the imagined product’s complement. The authors distinguish between two visualized consumption actions: use and acquisition. Both are predicted to increase the appeal of the complement, but this increase is expected to be asymmetric, with imagined acquisition leading to a greater increase than imagined use. Specifically, the authors propose that imagining use evokes consideration of how one would interact with the product, which increases the salience of the imagined product’s attributes. Conversely, imagining acquisition evokes consideration of why one would purchase the product, which increases the salience of the imagined product’s goals. As complementarity is defined by products’ shared goals (not physical attributes), it is predicted and shown that imagining acquisition results in
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-265
JournalPsychology & Marketing
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019

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