The good-in-bed effect: College students tendency to see themselves as better than others as a sex partner

James K. Beggan, Jennifer A. Vencill, Sheila Garos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-enhancement refers to the finding that people tend to see themselves as better than others. The present research tested whether people display self-enhancement with regard to beliefs about their competency as sexual partners (the good-in-bed effect). Participants were asked to list good and bad sexually related behaviors more frequently performed by the self or by others. Study 1 demonstrated that people selectively associate themselves with good and others with bad sexual behaviors. In Study 2, independent raters judged bad behaviors associated with the self as less negative than bad behaviors associated with others. Study 3 replicated the good-in-bed effect and also found that when the salience of the comparison between good and bad traits is increased, men are more likely than women to demonstrate the effect. Implications of the results for relationship satisfaction are considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-434
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied
Volume147
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Keywords

  • gender
  • self-concept
  • self-enhancement
  • sex
  • sexual self
  • stereotypes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The good-in-bed effect: College students tendency to see themselves as better than others as a sex partner'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this