The effects of a self-monitoring process on college students” learning in an introductory statistics course

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sixty-nine graduate students enrolled in a statistics class participated in this study, which investigated the effects of self-monitoring on learning and attitudes toward learning. With protocols designed for this study, subjects in a self-monitoring condition recorded frequency and intensity of their learning activities and rated selfefficacy of solving statistical problems. Subjects in an instructor-monitoring condition evaluated the instruction provided in the class. Subjects in a control condition took the course without any research activity. Scores obtained from class examinations and attitude inventories were the dependent variables. As predicted, the selfmonitoring group performed better than did the instructor-monitoring and control groups. No attitude difference was found. Implications for teaching graduate-level statistics are discussed, and future research on self-monitoring is suggested.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-40
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Experimental Education
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of a self-monitoring process on college students” learning in an introductory statistics course'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this