The effect of a pilot nutrition education intervention on perceived cancer risk in a rural Texas community.

Liliana Correa, Debra Reed, Barent McCool, Mary Murimi, Conrad Lyford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: A high consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grain foods, and adequate levels of physical activity are associated with a lower risk of obesity and lower risk of lifestyle cancers. Research suggests that rural communities have a high risk of unhealthy behaviors that may contribute to excessive weight gain and risk of lifestyle related cancers. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effect of an educational intervention in a rural Texas community on the intermediate outcomes of eating behavior (increasing the intake of fruits, vegetables, and whole grain foods) and physical activity behavior, and the distal outcome of body mass index (BMI). Methods: The intervention, guided by the Social Cognitive Theory, was implemented over a 10-month period and included a variety of community-based education activities related to nutrition, physical activity, and cancer in a variety of settings. The effect of the intervention was assessed by analyzing pre- and post-da
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-19
JournalTexas Public Health Journal
StatePublished - Feb 2016

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