The British Reception of Frankenstein (1818) and the Culture of Early Nineteenth-Century Science

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Abstract

This essay argues that Mary Shelley's 1818 novel Frankenstein continued to live in the European cultural imagination because its stage adaptations animated public interest in the medical and scientific discoveries that characterize the Romantic period. Theatrical adaptations preserved the Frankenstein story for a nineteenth-century public fascinated with both science and the supernatural, with both medical and Gothic accounts, with bodies both normal and monstrous.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe British Reception of Frankenstein (1818) and the Culture of Early Nineteenth-Century Science
PublisherLegenda: Studies in Comparative Literature
Pages105-117
ISBN (Print)9781781885482
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020

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