The Addition of Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate and Isomaltulose to Whey Protein Improves Recovery from Highly Demanding Resistance Exercise

William J. Kraemer, David R. Hooper, Tunde K. Szivak, Brian R. Kupchak, Courtenay Dunn-Lewis, Brett A. Comstock, Shawn D. Flanagan, David P. Looney, Adam J. Sterczala, William H. DuPont, J. Luke Pryor, Hiu Ying Luk, Jesse Maladoungdock, Danielle McDermott, Jeff S. Volek, Carl M. Maresh

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10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study evaluated whether a combination of whey protein (WP), calcium beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), and carbohydrate exert additive effects on recovery from highly demanding resistance exercise. Methods: Thirteen resistance-trained men (age: 22.6 ± 3.9 years; height: 175.3 ± 12.2 cm; weight: 86.2 ± 9.8 kg) completed a double-blinded, counterbalanced, within-group study. Subjects ingested EAS Recovery Protein (RP; EAS Sports Nutrition/Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, OH) or WP twice daily for 2 weeks prior to, during, and for 2 days following 3 consecutive days of intense resistance exercise. The workout sequence included heavy resistance exercise (day 1) and metabolic resistance exercise (days 2 and 3). The subjects performed no physical activity during day 4 (+24 hours) and day 5 (+48 hours), where recovery testing was performed. Before, during, and following the 3 workouts, treatment outcomes were evaluated using blood-based muscle damage markers and hormones, perceptual measures of muscle soreness, and countermovement jump performance. Results: Creatine kinase was lower for the RP treatment on day 2 (RP: 166.9 ± 56.4 vs WP: 307.1 ± 125.2 IU · L−1, p ≤ 0.05), day 4 (RP: 232.5 ± 67.4 vs WP: 432.6 ± 223.3 IU · L−1, p ≤ 0.05), and day 5 (RP: 176.1 ± 38.7 vs 264.5 ± 120.9 IU · L−1, p ≤ 0.05). Interleukin-6 was lower for the RP treatment on day 4 (RP: 1.2 ± 0.2 vs WP: 1.6 ± 0.6 pg · ml−1, p ≤ 0.05) and day 5 (RP: 1.1 ± 0.2 vs WP: 1.6 ± 0.4 pg · ml−1, p ≤ 0.05). Muscle soreness was lower for RP treatment on day 4 (RP: 2.0 ± 0.7 vs WP: 2.8 ± 1.1 cm, p ≤ 0.05). Vertical jump power was higher for the RP treatment on day 4 (RP: 5983.2 ± 624 vs WP 5303.9 ± 641.7 W, p ≤ 0.05) and day 5 (RP: 5792.5 ± 595.4 vs WP: 5200.4 ± 501 W, p ≤ 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that during times of intense conditioning, the recovery benefits of WP are enhanced with the addition of HMB and a slow-release carbohydrate. We observed reductions in markers of muscle damage and improved athletic performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-99
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2015

Keywords

  • HMB
  • carbohydrate
  • exercise
  • muscle damage
  • resistance training
  • whey protein

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    Kraemer, W. J., Hooper, D. R., Szivak, T. K., Kupchak, B. R., Dunn-Lewis, C., Comstock, B. A., Flanagan, S. D., Looney, D. P., Sterczala, A. J., DuPont, W. H., Pryor, J. L., Luk, H. Y., Maladoungdock, J., McDermott, D., Volek, J. S., & Maresh, C. M. (2015). The Addition of Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate and Isomaltulose to Whey Protein Improves Recovery from Highly Demanding Resistance Exercise. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 34(2), 91-99. https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2014.938790