Temporal patterns of bat activity on the High Plains of Texas

Julie A Parlos, Macy Madden, Lizette Siles, Fasial Ali Anwarali Khan, Cibele G. Sotero-Caio, Robert J. Baker, Robert Bradley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Texas is home to more wind turbines and more bat species than any other state in the United States. Insectivorous bats provide an important economical ecosystem service in this region through agricultural pest regulation. Unfortunately, bats can be impacted negatively by wind turbines, and migratory bat species particularly so. To understand how bat activity changes throughout the year in western Texas, activity was monitored through echolocation calls and opportunistic mist-netting efforts over a period of four years (2012–2015). Peaks in activity were observed from March through April, and again in September, which coincides with previously documented migratory periods for many species native to the High Plains of Texas is home to more wind turbines and more bat species than any other state in the United States. Insectivorous bats provide an important economical ecosystem service in this region through agricultural pest regulation. Unfortunately, bats can be impacted negativel
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)275-290
JournalSpecial Publications of the Museum of Texas Tech University
StatePublished - Oct 2019

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