Temperament influences endotoxin-induced changes in rectal temperature, sickness behavior, and plasma epinephrine concentrations in bulls

Nicole C. Burdick, Jeffery A. Carroll, Lindsey E. Hulbert, Jeffery W. Dailey, Michael A. Ballou, Ronald D. Randel, Scott T. Willard, Rhonda C. Vann, Thomas H. Welsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study was designed to determine the influence of temperament on endotoxin-induced changes in body temperature, sickness behavior, and stress hormone concentrations in cattle. Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score measured 28 d prior to weaning. In dwelling recording devices were used to monitor rectal temperature, and jugular catheters were used to collect blood samples to determine cortisol and epinephrine concentrations before and after LPS administration (0.5 μg/kg body weight). Temperamental bulls had the lowest peak rectal temperature and sickness behavior scores relative to the Calm and Intermediate bulls. Prior to the administration of LPS, Temperamental bulls had greater cortisol and epinephrine concentrations than Calm or Intermediate bulls. Cortisol concentrations increased following LPS administration but were not affected by temperament. Epinephrine concentrations peaked 1 h after LPS administration in Calm bulls. Temperamental bulls did not exhibit an epinephrine response to LPS challenge. These data demonstrate that the temperament of calves can modulate the physiological, behavioral, and endocrine responses of pre-pubertal Brahman bulls to endotoxin challenge. Specifically, temperament differentially affected the rectal temperature, sickness behavior and epinephrine, but not cortisol, responses to LPS challenge.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-364
Number of pages10
JournalInnate Immunity
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • bulls
  • cortisol
  • epinephrine
  • lipopolysaccharide
  • temperament

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Temperament influences endotoxin-induced changes in rectal temperature, sickness behavior, and plasma epinephrine concentrations in bulls'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Burdick, N. C., Carroll, J. A., Hulbert, L. E., Dailey, J. W., Ballou, M. A., Randel, R. D., Willard, S. T., Vann, R. C., & Welsh, T. H. (2011). Temperament influences endotoxin-induced changes in rectal temperature, sickness behavior, and plasma epinephrine concentrations in bulls. Innate Immunity, 17(4), 355-364. https://doi.org/10.1177/1753425910379144