Tele-operating usar robots: Does driving performance increase with aperture width or practice?

Miriam E. Armstrong, Keith S. Jones, Elizabeth A. Schmidlin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Successful tele-operation in Urban Search and Rescue depends on operators' perceptual judgment accuracy (e.g., judging whether a robot can pass through an opening) and driving performance (e.g., driving the robot through an opening without collision). Previous research (Jones, Johnson, & Schmidlin, 2011; Schmidlin, 2014) tested operators' perceptual judgments when tele-operating through apertures of varying widths. The current study is an exploratory reanalysis of the driving performance data collected in Jones et al. (2011) and Schmidlin (2014). Driving performance was defined as the proportion of times an operator passed through an aperture without colliding with the aperture. As aperture size increased, the proportion of apertures passed increased in a predictable quadratic pattern. Proportion passed scores were significantly higher at the end of the experiments, after approximately 1 hr of practice, than at the beginning of the experiments. We could not determine whether 1 hr of practice was sufficient for operators to reach maximum driving performance.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1372-1376
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289470
StatePublished - 2015
Event59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2015Oct 30 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2015-January
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period10/26/1510/30/15

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    Armstrong, M. E., Jones, K. S., & Schmidlin, E. A. (2015). Tele-operating usar robots: Does driving performance increase with aperture width or practice? In 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015 (pp. 1372-1376). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2015-January). Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc..