Teaching skills related to self-employment to adults with developmental disabilities: An analog analysis

Wesley H. Dotson, David M. Richman, Layla Abby, Samuel Thompson, Anthony Plotner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities (DD) have improved in the last several decades. There is increasing focus on helping people with DD sample more diverse employment options, including running their own businesses. The present study (1) evaluated the effects of a well-established behavioral teaching procedure on the acquisition of a sample of three broad classes of skills related to self-employment (worker, supervisor, and clerical work) in young adults with DD within an analog recycling business, and (2) investigated the extension of that treatment to the natural environment while working in isolation or in peer pairs. Results suggest that the teaching procedure was effective in teaching three broad classes of skills related to many self-employment possibilities, the skills generalized to the natural environment, and peer pairs supported each other to complete tasks with a high degree of accuracy required to run a recycling business. This study represents an initial demonstration that adults with DD can learn skills required to run their own business.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2336-2350
Number of pages15
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Developmental disabilities
  • Self-employment
  • Teaching interaction procedure

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