Teachers' verbal corrections and observers' perceptions of teaching and learning

Robert A. Duke, Jacqueline C. Henninger

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

We tested whether observers' perceptions of private lessons are affected by the type of verbalizations used by teachers to make corrections in student performance. We compared verbal corrections that were expressed as directive statements (i.e., specific directions to change some aspect of performance in a subsequent trial) and verbal corrections expressed as negative feedback statements (i.e., negative evaluations of student performance in a preceding performance trial). Participants viewed two videotaped private lessons. In one lesson, all corrections of student performance errors were expressed as directions to change some aspect of performance in the subsequent trial. In the other lesson, all corrections were expressed as negative feedback statements followed by a direction to play again. Subjects responded using a paper-and-pencil questionnaire with 10 statements about the teacher and student in each lesson. There were no meaningful differences in subjects' responses between the two lessons, both of which were rated highly positively. Asked to cite differences observed between the two lessons, few subjects identified any aspect of the teacher's feedback.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-87
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Research in Music Education
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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