Students as Virtual Scientists: An exploration of students' and teachers' perceived realness of a remote electron microscopy investigation

Gina Childers, M. Gail Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Remote access technologies enable students to investigate science by utilizing scientific tools and communicating in real-time with scientists and researchers with only a computer and an Internet connection. Very little is known about student perceptions of how real remote investigations are and how immersed the students are in the experience. This study, conducted with high school students and their teachers, explored the impact of students' perception of ownership and virtual presence during a remote investigation using a scanning electron microscope. Students were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: students able to select their own insect to use during the remote investigation, and students that did not select their own insects to view during the remote investigation. The results of this study showed that students in the experimental group who had choice and ownership of their insect reported being more present (less distracted) during the remote investigation than students in the control group, whereas students in the control group reported controlling the technology was easier than the experimental group. Students indicated the remote investigation was very real; however, the teachers of these students were less likely to describe the investigation as being real. The results of this study have practical implications for designing remote learning environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2433-2452
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Science Education
Volume37
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 13 2015

Keywords

  • Ownership
  • Remote microscopy
  • Science education
  • Virtual presence

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Students as Virtual Scientists: An exploration of students' and teachers' perceived realness of a remote electron microscopy investigation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this