Strip Spawning Methodology for Captive Propagation of Broadcast-Spawning Cyprinids in the Great Plains

Aaron C. Urbanczyk, Christa M. Woodley, Gene R. Wilde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the summer of 2011, large parts of Texas and Oklahoma experienced their worst drought in recorded history. Most of the rivers and streams in this region are inhabited by cyprinids that broadcast semibuoyant pelagic ova. These fish depend on flowing water for the hormonal cues that induce spawning and to allow ova to develop and hatch as they float downstream. During the drought, the Brazos and Canadian rivers, Texas, were reduced to isolated streambed pools. Monitoring efforts concluded that pelagic, broadcast-spawning cyprinids experienced complete reproductive failure in the Brazos River and had very little spawning success in the Canadian River. Personnel from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Texas Tech University began salvage operations in both rivers in September 2011 to ensure the survival of imperiled cyprinids. In spring 2012, standard captive propagation techniques were used with several species of cyprinids, with little success. As a result, we developed new techniques for four species of pelagic, broadcast-spawning cyprinids from the Brazos and Canadian rivers that could greatly increase hatchery program efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)340-348
Number of pages9
JournalNorth American Journal of Aquaculture
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

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