Strategies to predict and improve eating quality of cooked beef using carcass and meat composition traits in Angus cattle

R. G. Mateescu, P. A. Oltenacu, A. J. Garmyn, G. G. Mafi, D. L. VanOverbeke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Product quality is a high priority for the beef industry because of its importance as a major driver of consumer demand for beef and the ability of the industry to improve it. A 2-prong approach based on implementation of a genetic program to improve eating quality and a system to communicate eating quality and increase the probability that consumers’ eating quality expectations are met is outlined. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify the best carcass and meat composition traits to be used in a selection program to improve eating quality and 2) to develop a relatively small number of classes that reflect real and perceptible differences in eating quality that can be communicated to consumers and identify a subset of carcass and meat composition traits with the highest predictive accuracy across all eating quality classes. Carcass traits, meat composition, including Warner- Bratzler shear force (WBSF), intramuscular fat content (IMFC), trained sensory panel scores, and mineral composition traits of 1,666 Angus cattle were used in this study. Three eating quality indexes, EATQ1, EATQ2, and EATQ3, were generated by using different weights for the sensory traits (emphasis on tenderness, flavor, and juiciness, respectively). The best model for predicting eating quality explained 37%, 9%, and 19% of the variability of EATQ1, EATQ2, and EATQ3, and 2 traits, WBSF and IMFC, accounted for most of the variability explained by the best models. EATQ1 combines tenderness, juiciness, and flavor assessed by trained panels with 0.60, 0.15, and 0.25 weights, best describes North American consumers, and has a moderate heritability (0.18 ± 0.06). A selection index (Is= −0.5[WBSF] + 0.3[IMFC]) based on phenotypic and genetic variances and covariances can be used to improve eating quality as a correlated trait. The 3 indexes (EATQ1, EATQ2, and EATQ3) were used to generate 3 equal (33.3%) low, medium, and high eating quality classes, and linear combinations of traits that best predict class membership were estimated using a predictive discriminant analysis. The best predictive model to classify new observations into low, medium, and high eating quality classes defined by the EATQ1 index included WBSF, IMFC, HCW, and marbling score and resulted in a total error rate of 47.06%, much lower than the 60.74% error rate when the prediction of class membership was based on the USDA grading system. The 2 best predictors were WBSF and IMFC, and they accounted for 97.2% of the variability explained by the best model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2160-2171
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2016

Keywords

  • Angus
  • Beef
  • Eating quality
  • Prediction

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