Social Communication Questionnaire Scoring procedures for autism spectrum disorder and the prevalence of potential social communication disorder in ASD

Lucy Barnard-Brak, David M. Richman, Steven Randall Chesnut, Todd D. Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

In analyzing data from the National Database for Autism Research, we utilized Mokken scaling techniques as a means of creating a more effective and efficient screening procedure for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) via the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ). With a sample of 1,040, approximately 80% (n = 827) of the sample were males while approximately 20% (n = 213) were females. In regard to ethnicity, approximately 68% of the sample were White/Caucasian, while 7% were African American, 16% were Hispanic, 4% were Asian, and 1% were Native American or American Indian. As the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) states that, "individuals with a well-established DSM-IV diagnosis of autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified should be given the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder" (American Psychiatric Association, 2013, p. 51), the primary labeling difference between the DSM-IV and the DSM-5 would appear to be in identifying social communication disorder as a newly introduced disorder in the DSM-5, which we discuss. Though school psychologists are not dependent on the DSM to the same extent as clinical psychologists to provide services, school psychology is invested in the effective and efficient assessment of ASD. The current study demonstrates how Mokken scaling procedures may be utilized with respect to ASD identification via the SCQ as well as providing information regarding the prevalence of potential social communication disorder as a new disorder and its discrimination with ASD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)522-533
Number of pages12
JournalSchool Psychology Quarterly
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Item response theory
  • Mokken scaling

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