Simulation-based unassisted sit-to-stand motion prediction for healthy young individuals

Burak Ozsoy, James Yang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sit-to-stand (STS) is a common activity in daily lives which requires relatively high joint torques and a robust coordination of lower and upper extremities with postural stability. Many elderly, people with lower limb injuries, and patients with neurological disorders or musculoskeletal abnormalities have difficulties in accomplishing this task. In contrast to the literature on numerous experimental studies of STS, there are limited studies that were carried out through simulations. In literature, mostly bilateral symmetry was assumed for STS tasks, however even for healthy people, it is more difficult to perform STS tasks with a perfect bilateral symmetry. The goal of this research is to develop a threedimensional unassisted STS motion prediction formulation for healthy young individuals. Predicted results will be compared with experimental results found in literature for the validation of the proposed formulation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication10th International Conference on Multibody Systems, Nonlinear Dynamics, and Control
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791846391
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
EventASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014 - Buffalo, United States
Duration: Aug 17 2014Aug 20 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume6

Conference

ConferenceASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityBuffalo
Period08/17/1408/20/14

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