Self-initiated smoking cessation: A review of the empirical literature from a stress and coping perspective

Michael P. Carey, Deborah L. Snel, Kate B. Carey, C. Steven Richards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ninety-five percent of ex-smokers have quit smoking without professional assistance. Research investigating self-initiated smoking cessation has increased to the point where a sizable data base on this phenomenon is now available. In this paper we review the research literature that has investigated unaided smoking cessation in order to better understand the quitting process, to identify useful strategies for prospective quitters, and to provide suggestions for professionally based interventions. Our review, organized from a stress and coping perspective, suggests that cognitive appraisal of the quitting process (particularly self-efficacy) and the ways in which a smoker copes with quitting are important determinants of successful cessation. Suggestions for future research of self-initiated smoking cessation are offered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-341
Number of pages19
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1989

Keywords

  • appraisal
  • coping
  • self-control
  • self-help
  • smoking cessation
  • stress

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