Self-efficacy as a predictor of commitment to the teaching profession: A meta-analysis

Steven Randall Chesnut, Hansel Burley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

This meta-analysis examined research on the effects of preservice and inservice teachers' self-efficacy beliefs on commitment to the teaching profession. Unlike previous studies on self-efficacy and commitment, this review systematically examines the effects found within the literature and highlights important theoretical and methodological issues. A total of 33 qualified studies were included in the final analysis, including 16,122 preservice and inservice teachers. Findings suggest that preservice and inservice teachers' self-efficacy beliefs influence their commitment to the teaching profession (ES = +0.32). However, these effects vary based upon the conceptual accuracy of the self-efficacy measure and the origin of data. Conceptually accurate self-efficacy measures resulted in significantly higher effect sizes. Additionally, the specificity of questionnaire items and conceptual accuracy of the self-efficacy measure positively predicted the relationships between self-efficacy beliefs and commitment to teaching. Implications for the measurement of self-efficacy and interpretation of preservice and inservice teacher self-efficacy beliefs are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalEducational Research Review
Volume15
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • Commitment to teaching
  • Meta-analysis
  • Self-efficacy

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