Sediment-air equilibrium partitioning of semi-volatile hydrophobic organic compounds Part 2. Saturated vapor pressures, and the effects of sediment moisture content and temperature on the partitioning of polyaromatic hydrocarbons

G. De Seze, K. T. Valsaraj, D. D. Reible, L. J. Thibodeaux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

A gas saturation methodology was used to determine the sediment/air partition coefficient (K(SA)) for phenanthrene and dibenzofuran on a local sediment from the Campus Lake, Baton Rouge. The effects of sediment moisture content, air relative humidity and temperature on K(SA) for phenanthrene were ascertained. The saturated vapor pressures of the compounds were also measured. The sediment moisture content had a striking effect on K(SA); increasing sediment moisture content decreased K(SA). Temperature also had a dramatic effect on K(SA). The variation with temperature was used to evaluate the heats of adsorption on both 'dry' (<0.8% by mass of water) and 'wet' (>6% by mass of water) sediments. The heat of adsorption for phenanthrene normalized to unit molecular surface area indicated for the physically adsorbed organic compound was seven times smaller than that for a water molecule. The experimental value of K(SA) was used to test a proposed theoretical model. A good agreement was observed for both phenanthrene and dibenzofuran. The model can be extended to other compounds and sediment types for prediction of air emissions from exposed sediment and dredged materials. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-44
Number of pages18
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume253
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2000

Keywords

  • Moisture and temperature effects
  • Sediment-air partition constant

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