Scorpion venom heat-resistant protein decreases immunoreactivity of OX-42-positive microglia cells in MPTP-treated mice

Shengming Yin, Deqin Yu, Xi Gao, Yan Peng, Yanhui Feng, Jie Zhao, Yiyuan Tang, Wanqin Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Microglia function as the immune surveyors of the brain under normal physiological conditions. However, microglia become activated in response to brain injuries and immunological stimulation. Objective: To explore the influence of scorpion venom (SV) heat-resistant protein on frontal cortex and hippocampal microglia cells in a mice model of Parkinson's disease. Design, time and setting: Randomized, controlled, cellular immunity study. The experiment was performed at the Physiology Department Laboratory in Dalian Medical University between June 2005 and July 2008. Materials: Ninety-six healthy, C57Bl/6 mice; 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) from Sigma, USA; SV heat-resistant protein (Experimental Base Institute in Dalian Medical University). The mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 24): normal control, negative control, model, and SV heat-resistant protein. Methods: Mice in the model and SV heat-resistant protein groups were subcutaneously injected with MPTP (20 mg/kg) to model Parkinson's disease, while the normal control and negative control groups were injected with physiological saline in the neck for 8 successive days. In addition, mice in the model and normal control groups were intraperitoneally injected with physiological saline 2 hours following administration, while SV heat-resistant protein and negative control groups were injected SV heat-resistant protein (0.01 mg/kg). Main outcome measures: Immunoreactivity of microglia cells in MPTP-treated mice. Results: Compared with normal control mice, MPTP-treated mice displayed increased OX-42 expression in the brain. However, in the SV heat-resistant protein-treated mice, OX-42 expression was decreased, compared to the model group. In the model mouse group, the number of OX-42-positive microglia was increased in the frontal cortex, caudatum, and hippocampal hilus, compared to the normal control mice (P < 0.01). However, in the SV heat-resistant protein-treated mice, the number of OX-42-positive microglia significantly decreased in the frontal cortex, caudatum, and hippocampal hilus, compared to the model group (P < 0.01). Conclusion: SV heat-resistant protein inhibited MPTP-induced microglial activation in the mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus, resulting in reduced microglial activation in the brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)967-970
Number of pages4
JournalNeural Regeneration Research
Volume3
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Keywords

  • 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine
  • Microglia
  • Mouse
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Spatial learning and memory

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